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National Reconciliation Week 2018 “Don’t Keep History A Mystery: Learn. Share. Grow”.

31 May 10:00 by Anthony Kenworthy

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Lloyd Connect acknowledges the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of this nation. We acknowledge the traditional custodians of the lands on which our company is located and where we conduct our business. We pay our respects to ancestors and Elders, past and present. Lloyd Connect is committed to honouring Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ unique cultural and spiritual relationships to the land, waters and seas and their rich contribution to society.

National Reconciliation Week #NRW2018 is bookended by two milestones that have occurred on the path to reconciliation, the first being the May 27th 1967 referendum and the second being the 1992 High Court of Australia decision on June 03rd which recognised native title in Australia for the first time, this date is often referred to as High Court Mabo decision. National Reconciliation Week has been celebrated annually since 1996.

“Don’t Keep History A Mystery: Learn. Share. Grow”. This year during National Reconciliation Week, Reconciliation Australia reconciliation.org.au invites all Australians to learn and explore the history and culture associated with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

This year National Reconciliation Week was preceded by National Sorry Day which occurs annually on May 26th and has done so since 1998. May 26th holds great significance for the Stolen Generations, as well as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and their supporters among non-indigenous Australians as this was the date in 1997 when in Federal Parliament the Bringing Them Home report was tabled. National Sorry Day is an annual event to remember and commemorate the mistreatment of the country's Aboriginal People. During the 20th century, Australian government policies resulted in a "Stolen Generation", described by John Torpey in his book Making Whole what Has Been Smashed: On Reparations Politics as "Aboriginal children separated, often forcibly, from their families in the interest of turning them into white Australians".

May 27th 1967, 90.77% of eligible Australians voted YES overwhelmingly to the question “DO YOU APPROVE the proposed law for the alteration of the Constitution entitled— 'An Act to alter the Constitution so as to omit certain words relating to the People of the Aboriginal Race in any State and so that Aboriginals are to be counted in reckoning the Population'?”. The result of this vote saw with immediate effect sections 51 (xxvi) and 127 altered in the Australian constitution to include Aboriginal Australians in the determinations of population.